ARSL http://arsl.info Association for Rural and Small Libraries Wed, 23 Aug 2017 18:18:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Activities & Attractions In St. George, Utah http://arsl.info/activities-attractions-in-st-george-utah/ Thu, 17 Aug 2017 02:09:03 +0000 http://arsl.info/?p=8449 St. George: Everything from A to Zion

With a thriving arts scene, a temperate climate, ribbons of emerald green fairways, and the incredible scenery surrounding the area, St. George is a haven you will wish you had discovered long ago. Just 90 minutes north of Las Vegas Nevada, in the southwest corner of Utah, desert red rock meets alpine mountains in a stunning display of geologic majesty. Rich in pioneer history and surrounded by beautiful multi-colored cliffs: there are many places to explore and attractions to visit.

https://www.visitstgeorge.com/

TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS: (Does not include all options – search for your best fit)

ACTIVITIES & ATTRACTIONS:

TUACAHN OUTDOOR AMPHITHEATRE – 20-minute drive:

  1. https://www.tuacahn.org/Online/
  2. Nestled in the red sandstone cliffs near Padre Canyon, Tuacahn Amphitheatre in Utah is a spectacular 1,920-seat outdoor concert and performing arts venue. Just minutes from St. George, Tuacahn Amphitheatre presents exciting Broadway shows and musicals, concerts, festivals and holiday events.
  3. Shows for 2017 season: Mamma Mia, Shrek, the Musical, Disney’s Newsies
  4. 1100 Tuacahn Dr., Ivins, UT 84738  Box office:  (435) 746-9882 or (435) 652-3300

GOLFING – local:

  1. https://www.stgeorgeutahgolf.com/list-of-st-george-golf-courses/
  2. Phone: (435) 216-1179 – can book all courses  Email:  brian@stgeorgeutahgolf.com
  3. Golf Courses:
    • St. George Golf Club
    • Golf at The Ledges
    • Coral Canyon
    • SunRiver Golf Club
    • Green Spring Golf Course
    • Sand Hollow Resort Golf Club
    • Entrada at Snow Canyon
    • Sky Mountain Golf Course
    • Sunbrook Golf Club
    • Southgate Golf Club
    • Red Hills Golf Course – 9 Holes
    • Conestoga Golf Club – Mesquite

HIKING: – 20-minute drive:

  1. SNOW CANYON STATE PARK:
  2. OTHER HIKING DESTINATIONS

CASINO/GAMBLING: 30-minute drive

  1. MESQUITE, NEVADA: Evening charters available
  2. CASINOS, RESTAURANTS, SHOWS, SPAS, GOLF

SHOPPING: Local

  1. The Shoppes at Zion (Outlet Mall)
  2. Red Cliffs Mall:
  3. George Chamber of Commerce:

GEORGE HISTORIC DOWNTOWN WALKING TOUR: Local

LIBRARIES: Local

  1. GEORGE LIBRARY:
  2. SANTA CLARA LIBRARY:

ADDITIONAL ATTRACTIONS IN ST. GEORGE

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Activities & Attractions In Southern Utah http://arsl.info/activities-attractions-in-southern-utah/ Thu, 17 Aug 2017 01:42:28 +0000 http://arsl.info/?p=8438 St. George: Everything from A to Zion:

Southern Utah is home to many natural resources and offers activities to accommodate the art enthusiasts, the scenic driver or the most seasoned hiker. With five National Parks and many State Parks, it is a worldwide travel destination.  From the grandeur of Zion National Park to the other-world hoodoos of Goblin Valley State Park, these are all also popular scenic backdrops for countless movies.  In Southern Utah, encounters with many natural landmarks are within arm’s reach, such as the Delicate Arch near Moab.  Hiking and sightseeing adventures are available, from ADA compliant trails to advanced climber challenges.

https://www.visitutah.com/

https://www.visitutah.com/places-to-go/state-and-federal-recreation-areas/southern

TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS:  (Does not include all options – search for your best fit)

ACTIVITIES & ATTRACTIONS:

NATIONAL PARKS

https://www.nps.gov/state/ut/

Visit the “Mighty Five”: Arches, Bryce Canyon, Canyonlands, Capitol Reef, Zions: https://utah.com/national-parks

The Mighty 5® national parks in Utah draw several million visitors from around the world each year to marvel at the surreal scenery and unforgettable activities. A trip to The Mighty 5 means watching the sunrise over the towering depths of Canyonlands National Park, then watching the sunset through an impossibly delicate rock bow in Arches National Park. It means standing nose-to-nose with ancient petroglyphs in Capitol Reef National Park, then lying on your back as a beautiful meteor shower streaks across the Milky Way. It means gazing down at coral-hued rock hoodoos in Bryce Canyon National Park, then gazing upward at the steep walls of slot canyon trails in Zion National Park. It means hiking, river rafting, biking, picnicking, walking, mule riding, exploring and stargazing.

ARCHES

BRYCE CANYON

  1. https://utah.com/bryce-canyon-national-park
  2. https://www.nps.gov/brca/index.htm
  3. 435 834-5322

CANYONLANDS

  1. https://utah.com/canyonlands-national-park
  2. https://www.nps.gov/cany/index.htm
  3. 435 719-2313

CAPITAL REEF

  1. https://utah.com/capitol-reef-national-park
  2. https://www.nps.gov/care/index.htm
  3. (435) 425-3791

ZION NATIONAL PARK: 1-hour drive

    1. https://utah.com/zion-national-park
    2. https://www.nps.gov/zion/index.htm
    3. (435) 772-3256
    4. Zion National Park Wilderness hiking guide:

      https://www.nps.gov/zion/planyourvisit/upload/hiking_guide_12_21_16.pdf

    5. 2017 Spring map & guide:

      https://www.nps.gov/zion/upload/MG-Spring-2017-web.pdf

    6. Wilderness guide:

      https://www.nps.gov/zion/learn/news/upload/ZionWG2017.pdf

OTHER STATE PARKS & OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES:

CEDAR BREAKS:

      1. https://utah.com/cedar-breaks-national-monument
      2. https://www.nps.gov/cebr/index.htm
      3. (435) 586-945-4420

ESCALANTE GRAND STAIRCASE: CANYONS SECTION

      1. https://utah.com/escalante-canyon
      2. Escalante/Boulder chamber of Commerce (435) 826-4810

GOBLIN VALLEY:

      1. https://utah.com/goblin-valley-state-park
      2. https://stateparks.utah.gov/parks/goblin-valley/

GLEN CANYON NATIONAL RECREATION AREA – LAKE POWELL:

      1. https://utah.com/lake-powell
      2. https://www.nps.gov/glca/index.htm
      3. (928) 608-6200

UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL in CEDAR CITY (45 minutes)

      1. https://www.bard.org/
      2. Many activities throughout each day
      3. 2017 SHOWS
        • Sept 5: “Shakespeare in Love”
        • Sept 6: Romeo & Juliet
        • Sept 7: “As You Like It”
        • Sept 8: A Midsummer Night’s Dream
        • Sept 9: Romeo & Juliet

MORMON PIONEER NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA

      1. Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area: http://www.mormonpioneerheritage.org/
      2. George Mormon Historical Sites: https://utah.com/mormon/st-george-history
      3. The Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area is the only National Heritage Area designated and named for a specific people, the Mormon Pioneers – as they forged to the west, with dedication, fortitude, and extraordinary efforts. It has been identified by Congress as a factor in the expansion of the United States.
      4. Watch a TV series called “Discovery Road” about the areas covered by the MPHNA. Chose episodes at:  http://www.mormonpioneerheritage.org/discovery-road-videos/
      5. See the “Travel Planner” page at http://www.mormonpioneerheritage.org/travel-planner-mormon-pioneer-national-heritage-area/ for more information.

HIKING TRAILS

      1. https://utah.com/hiking/st-george
      2. RED CLIFFS NATURE TRAIL: https://utah.com/hiking/red-cliffs
        • Short, scenic and fun, this little trail leads from the campground at Red Cliffs Recreation Area into a narrow canyon beside a small stream. As you hike, the canyon narrows until it is just a few feet wide and a beautiful little waterfall blocks the trail. But it is easy to climb around and the trail continues into the canyon.
      3. SNOW CANYON STATE PARK – (20 minutes)
        • https://stateparks.utah.gov/parks/snow-canyon/discover/
        • Snow Canyon State Park is a 7,400-acre scenic park quietly tucked amid lava flows and soaring sandstone cliffs in a strikingly colorful and fragile desert environment. Majestic views and the subtle interplay of light, shadow, and color dancing across canyon walls evoke strong emotional responses from visitors. Located in the 62,000 acre Red Cliffs Desert Reserve, established to protect the federally listed desert tortoise and its habitat, the park offers opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts of all ages. Activities include hiking, nature studies, wildlife viewing, photography, camping, ranger talks and junior ranger programs. There are more than 38 miles of hiking trails, a three-mile paved walking/biking trail and over 15 miles of equestrian trails.

GHOST TOWNS

      1. Silver Reef: http://www.silverreefutah.org/
      2. Silver Reef was a mining boom town in the late 1800s, with the discovery of silver in sandstone – a geological rarity. The area is now a “Wild West Ghost Town located in a stunning geological setting.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

      1. GEORGE & SOUTHERN UTAH
      2. http://suindependent.com/st-george-utah-events-calendar/#/
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ARSL Hosts Game Night at Annual Conference http://arsl.info/arsl-hosts-game-night-at-annual-conference/ Mon, 14 Aug 2017 18:36:46 +0000 http://arsl.info/?p=8436 Gather with old friends and meet new ones at Game Night on Friday, Sept. 8, beginning at 5:30 pm in the Hilton Garden Inn Lounge. A variety of board games will be available including Backgammon, Scrabble, Forbidden City, Ticket to Ride, cards and more. Have a few drinks and pass the evening away laughing and having fun with other ARSL attendees.

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June and July listserv recap http://arsl.info/june-and-july-listserv-recap/ Thu, 10 Aug 2017 05:16:51 +0000 http://arsl.info/?p=8414 Beginning in June, the listserv saw numerous announcements for upcoming workshops, job openings and the ARSL Conference in St. George, Utah, September 7-9, 2017. In addition, lots of questions were asked and ideas offered.

Programming:
Ideas for a United Way project grant included STEM programs such as Lego club Mindstorm, Ozobots, and Makey/Makey. Can help kids go from guided to self-directed activities.

How to spend $15,000 for a health-related program? Host a health fair partnering with local hospital; offer free screenings for language and vision for infants and toddlers; raise awareness of Autism, Downs Syndrome, Cystic Fibrosis and other issues that affect children; offer hearing, vision and blood work clinics for adults; host healthy cooking classes, including kitchen basics for kids.

Staffing:
How to manage existing staff resistant to implementing changes? Have a detailed job descriptions and a review process to be approved by the board; document, document, document; have meeting with board and staff to clarify expectations to perform duties with a reasonable amount of training; work as a team with staff to get their buy-in, including input on expectations of the director and vision for the library, keeping conversation positive and firm.

What benefits does a full-time librarian receive? Benefits include annual leave and sick leave, paid holidays, small bonuses and comp time as approved by the board; some boards offer health insurance and 3 days of personal time; higher end benefits include full insurance, health insurance, 12 days of sick leave, and vacation days based on longevity with a minimum of 96 hours per year.

What kind of physical requirements do you require for employees? Lifting 25 lbs to 50 lbs; standing long periods of time; good hearing, especially on the telephone; hand dexterity, bending/kneeling and reaching up; climbing a ladder; climbing stairs several times a day.

Collection management:
What are your policies on ordering titles requested by patrons? Collection development policy should cover how requests are handled; consider these requests as you would for any other potential title; encourage patrons to sponsor a title by paying the library’s discounted price with the privilege being first to borrow it (can include acknowledgement inside the book. Use Inter-Library Loan system for older titles and those that don’t fit into your collection. If your library system charges for ILLs, you may have to consider limits on the number of requests.

Do you have database access to Consumer Reports? EBSCO offers digital access to their magazine collection through Flipster (expect to pay $1,000 or more); some digital collections are freely available through the state library.

How do libraries lessen DVD theft? DEMCO hanging disk system behind the desk; put out binders with movie summaries for browsing and clerk retrieves requested DVDs; shelve empty DVD cases and retrieve disk when DVD case is brought to desk to check-out.

What DVD/CD cleaning systems do libraries use and do provide a public disk cleaning service? Suggestions included ELMUSA, Echo Pro, JFJ Easy Pro, and Echo Smart II. For libraries that charge, fees ranged from $1.00 per disk to $3.00 per disk.

Do you check out magazines and for how long? 21-days just like books; current issues for in-house use only; 1 week loan with two renewals if no holds.

Public services:
Do you issue cards to children with or without parental permission? Do you have over 18/under 18 applications? Lots of variation in the responses from libraries: require parent/guardian to sign child’s card to assume financial responsibility for borrowed items; library issues a “family” card gathering all check-out information for the family in one account; library issues cards from birth, those under six years of age must have the parent/guardian present identification, sign the application, and accept financial responsibility.

How do you manage teens in your space? Set rules such as Respect Others, Respect Yourself, and Respect the Space. Check out Xbox controls and games to hold them responsible for their safe return.

Do you have policies for handling difficult patrons? Have a patron code of conduct; some use eviction notices which may be rescinded for limited use of the library; a permanent ban would involve the police issuing a no trespass order but these are hard to enforce.

Do you charge scanning or faxing fees? Responses favored free for scanning. Answers varied for faxing: $ .50/page; $.25/page receiving, $1.00/page if sending locally; $2.00/page if sending long distance, $2.00/page for single page, then $1.00 per page; no overseas faxing and don’t receive faxes; $.30/page locally; $.50/page long distance.

What are your experiences with DeepFreeze or PC Reservation? RebootRestoryRX is free and can be used in place of DeepFreeze to prevent unwanted changes; Time Limit Manager from Fortress Grand should be powerful enough for a small library setting; an open source time manager is Libki.

Finances:
Suggestions for a Foundation/Friends group pushing the boundaries of their board vs. the library board resulted in suggestions to compose and have both boards sign a memorandum of understanding detailing what is expected from each party.

Some discussion about handling Friends’ funds: notify Friends’ treasurer when book sale cash boxes appear full, when a large bill or check has been received; most libraries do not deal with the friends’ money, rather it goes into a locked box and it is up to treasurer to make sure it is deposited on time.

How do you address your fiscal body when presenting a budget? Compile a list of programs and services; highlight materials purchased and services offered for the past year; talk about what you do specifically that makes a difference people’s lives; tell a success story of how someone benefited from your services; share your vision of the future.

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Pre-Conference Workshops http://arsl.info/pre-conference-workshops/ Tue, 08 Aug 2017 18:30:07 +0000 http://arsl.info/?p=8407 The PLA Dynamic Planning Institute is sold out, but the other pre and post conference workshops still have a little room.

Have a look at the descriptions and sign-up today! (Spaces are going fast…..)

How to Activate Voters and Constituents for Funding Support

The Care and Feeding of Your Online Presence (all you need is love…and a few other things)

Celebrating the Stories of Your Community: A Listening Session with StoryCorps

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Teen Librarian, Kendall Young Library, Webster City, IA http://arsl.info/teen-librarian-kendall-young-library-webster-city-ia/ Thu, 03 Aug 2017 21:09:49 +0000 http://arsl.info/?p=8348 Seeking an enthusiastic, creative, tech-savvy, service-oriented Teen Librarian to join the staff at Kendall Young Library. You will plan and coordinate teen programming (grades 6-12) and be responsible for teen collection development. Additionally, this position provides reference services for adults and teens; helps patrons use our digital and physical resources; and handles publicity for the library. Kendall Young Library is a forward-thinking, rural library rooted in a rich history in Webster City, Iowa. As a smaller library (town population around 8,000), our staff have the opportunity to work on a wide variety of projects and tasks.

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:

Teen Services

  • Plan and staff teen programs, including the after-school Teen Lounge program. • Coordinate the Teen Summer and Winter Reading Programs. • Develop and maintain the Teen collection based on reviews, evaluation of current collection, and patron requests. • Actively work at outreach to the area middle and high schools as well as other teen serving organizations. • Advocate for the importance of teen library services in the community.

Reference • Work the Reference Desk 20-25 hours per week providing reference and readers’ advisory service to adults and teens. • Assist patrons with computers and printers. • Instruct patrons in use of library resources, particularly accessing online resources with digital devices. • Assist patrons with genealogy searches and use of the library’s local history collection and digital newspaper archive. • Promote library services through tours, demonstrations, talks, and displays. • Maintain confidentiality in all patron and staff interactions. • Serve as the “person in charge” in the absence of a Supervisor. • Perform copy cataloging of various formats. • Collaborate with the Reference team and a library staff of 18 (10 FTE).

Publicity • Manage social media accounts (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest, YouTube) for the library to engage the community and promote the library and its services. • Create publicity materials for the library, including flyers, email newsletters, press releases, and newspaper columns. • Manage and update content on the website.

Perform other related duties as assigned

EDUCATION/QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Bachelor’s Degree required. Master’s Degree in Library Science (MLS or MLIS) preferred. New graduates and currently enrolled master’s students encouraged to apply. • Experience working with the public required. • Prior experience working with teens highly preferred. • Previous library, bookstore or teaching experience preferred

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ABILITIES:

  • Knowledge of current developments, trends, practices and philosophy in library services, especially teen services. • Basic understanding of adolescent development and issues facing teens and tweens. • Knowledge of teen literature and programming. • Excellent written communication skills. • Strong interpersonal and public speaking skills. • Presentation or training experience. • Experience with library computer technology. • High level of computer skills. Experience with MS Office Professional (particularly Publisher), Facebook, Instagram and Twitter required. • Flexibility and excellent customer service attitude. • Spanish language ability is a plus.

How to apply: Send a cover letter, resume, essay (see below) and 3 references to Ketta Lubberstedt-Arjes, Interim Library Director, at kettala@kylib.org

This position requires an essay. Please write and submit an essay (no more than 500 words) describing the attributes of an exemplary Teen Librarian.

Deadline: Position open until filled. Preference given to applications received by August 23.

Location: Kendall Young Library in Webster City, Iowa (www.kylib.org)

Starting Wage: $34,000-$38,000 depending on experience and qualifications. Benefits: Vacation and sick leave (15 vacation days, 2 personal days, 7 paid holidays and 12 sick days per year), IPERS (Iowa Public Employees’ Retirement System) and contribution towards health insurance. Hours: 40 hours per week (includes one night per week and rotating Saturdays). Typical Schedule: Monday-Wednesday: 9:00am-6:00pm Thursday: 11:00am-8:00pm Friday: 9:00am-6:00pm Rotating Saturdays

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Children and Youth Services Coordinator, South Dakota State Library, Pierre, SD http://arsl.info/children-and-youth-services-coordinator-south-dakota-state-library-pierre-sd/ Wed, 02 Aug 2017 19:39:25 +0000 http://arsl.info/?p=8345 The South Dakota State Library has an open position for their Children and Youth Services Coordinator. The successful candidate will administers a state library program through planning, implementation, and coordination with other library programs; public or school libraries, agencies, or states; and provides consultative services to South Dakota libraries in the areas of development and operations to ensure the effective delivery of library services and the accomplishment of the goals and objectives of the program. This Senior Librarian works with other librarians at the State Library and specifically oversees the children and youth services area.

The Ideal Candidate Will Have: A bachelor’s degree required; library experience and/or coursework preferred; master’s degree in library and information science (MLS) preferred.

Knowledge of: 21st century library trends, technology, and innovation, best practices, policy and procedure writing, early literacy, children and youth physical and cognitive development, youth services, children and youth literature, social media, information literacy, knowledge of generational and multicultural issues and multi-literacy skills.

Skill to: Communicate, learn continuously, team builder, plan, organize, problem solve, create, supervise; write, read and analyze effectively and critically.

Post the following on the South Dakota BHR website: Vitae or resume, cover letter, list of professional references, college transcripts required. http://bhr.sd.gov/

Working conditions or other specific requirements: Must be able to lift 40 lbs. and hold a valid legal driver’s license from the State of South Dakota.

Ability to: Instruct adults, lead in areas assigned, create presentations, vet and demo software, curate resources, book-talk, storytelling, research and manage grants, aggregate statistics, write/create surveys, work in teams, coordinate projects, travel extensively both in-state and out of state, develop goals, evaluation tools and learning outcomes; develop training materials, negotiate contracts, consults with local librarians, research and answer questions concerning budgets, governance, collection development, technology, trends, ILS systems, new and creative children and teen programming.

Salary range depending on experience and educational level: $19.14 – $22.98. Full-time position. Office in Pierre. Some moving funds may be available. Travel expected. Full South Dakota state benefits.

Additional Requirements: In your cover letter, describe any work or life-related experience which would indicate that you possess the knowledge, skill, or ability listed below: The ideal candidate must possess a high level of: professionalism, attention to detail, communication, creativity, continuous learning, customer service, information seeking, planning and organization, problem solving, relationship building, teamwork, as well as demonstrate excellent oral and written skills.

If you have questions about the position, call the State Librarian, Daria Bossman 605-773-3131 ext. 6. Or email daria.bossman@state.sd.us

The position will remain open until filled.

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Director, Portneuf District, Chubbuck, ID http://arsl.info/director-portneuf-district-chubbuck-id/ Tue, 01 Aug 2017 15:04:33 +0000 http://arsl.info/?p=8340 The Portneuf District Library, located in Chubbuck, Idaho, seeks a community-minded, innovative, and visionary leader as Director of the library. The ideal candidate will provide positive and dynamic leadership enabling the Portneuf Library to continue growing and changing to meet the needs of the community. The Portneuf Library serves a population size of nearly 25,000 and is embedded in the community. An engaging community leader and partner is required, as the Director will network with key stakeholders in Portneuf’s district. This position reports to an elected 5 member Board of Trustees.

The mission of the Portneuf Library is to: Provide materials, programs, and services that encourage lifelong learning, Encourage multi-generational community building, Support the intellectual and recreational self-development of the individual in a comfortable physical and digital environment.

The library’s annual budget is approximately $600,000 per year, and average entrance counts and circulations are 13,000 per month. Portneuf prioritizes community activities and highly used collections determined by the individuals it serves, and hosts an average of 600 programs a year with 22,000 attendees. The library has six full-time staff members and eight part-time clerks.

Chubbuck is located due north of Pocatello, Idaho, and is situated 2.5 hours from Sun Valley, Jackson, Wyoming and Yellowstone Park. The Library district encompasses north Bannock County, excepting the city of Pocatello. Strong relationships with neighboring libraries and the Library Consortium of Eastern Idaho are required in this position. Teamwork and collaboration is essential.

Essential qualities candidates must have include: Strong fiscal and budgeting skills Strategic thinking and planning abilities Excellent communication and people skills The ability to hire, train, mentor, and motivate staff Knowledge of public library administration Master’s in Library Science Five years of library experience, with three years or more of increasing responsibility and work experience with supervising staff, services, collections, and related library work.

The salary range for this position is 54,829 – 69,326, DOE. Benefits include health, dental, and vision insurance, paid holidays, sick and vacation leave, and the PERSI (Public Employee Retirement System of Idaho) retirement system.

Please direct your cover letter, resume, and references, and any questions you have to the Library Board Chair, Dean Hazen, at: deanhazen@gmail.com Applications will be accepted until September 10th, 2017. The Portneuf Library is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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2017 Conference Schedule – as of 8/8/2017 http://arsl.info/2017-conference-schedule-as-of-72617/ Wed, 26 Jul 2017 17:20:09 +0000 http://arsl.info/?p=8304

Wednesday, September 6th ~ PRE-CONFERENCE SESSIONS
9:00 – 5:00 P.M. Entrada C PLA Dynamic Planning Institute Stephanie Gerding
1:00 – 5:00 P.M. Entrada A How To Activate Voters and Constituents for Funding Support Crystal Schimpf and John Chrastka and Peter Bromberg
1:00 – 5:00 P.M. Entrada B The Care and Feeding of Your Online Presence (All You Need Is Love…and a Few Other Things) Michelle Drumm, New Why Co-Founder / Web & Natalie Winslow, New Why Co-Founder / Marketing
5:30 – 7:30 P.M. Garden Room WELCOME RECEPTION at the DIXIE CENTER REFRESHMENTS & ENTERTAINMENT (preregistration required)
 Thursday, September 7th
7:30 – 5:30 p.m. DIXIE CENTER REGISTRATION DESK OPEN
8:00 – 9:00 a.m. BALLROOMS A, B, C “LIFTING OTHERS: VOLUNTEERS BREAKFAST”  (pre registration required) All attendees welcomed to learn about ARSL Committees along with information for new members and first time conference attendees.
9:00 – 10:30 a.m. BALLROOMS A, B, C WELCOME AND CONFERENCE OPENING Judy Calhoun, ARSL President and Donna Jones Morris, Utah State Library
BALLROOMS A, B, C KEYNOTE SESSION – JILL NYSTUL Sponsored by:
10:30 – 11:00 a.m. EXHIBITOR AREA EXHIBITS GRAND OPENING! Exhibits open until 5:00 today
11:00 – 12:00 p.m. ENTRADA A Nitty Gritty Policy Manual Makeover presented by Jennie Garner We’ll look at policy vs. procedures and learn simple strategies to overhaul policies to give staff decision-making power translating to better service. I worked with staff and board members to rewrite and condense our policies and make them proactive and positive where they were formerly more reactive and punitive.
ENTRADA B Improving Your Library’s Cultural Competence presented by Lorie Womack This presentation will assist librarians in developing a wider patron base from differing cultural, economic, and social backgrounds.  Attendees will be encouraged to become aware of the diverse cultures within their community.  Emphasis will be placed on how to communicate with those whom we serve whatever their background.
ENTRADA C Connecting Local Schools & Libraries presented by Meredith Fletcher Looking to improve the relationship between your library and the local schools? Our Library Link program provides personalized deliveries to each school in our district everyday class is in session- without the burden of a big bookmobile! A busy schedule or a lack of transportation doesn’t have to affect access to your institution. Learn how the Westerville Public Library has bridged this gap and ensures equal access to resources for all of our students.
SUNBROOK A Voices for Young Authors: Empowering Children Through Libraries presented by Laura Wenzel A Voice for Young Authors (VYA) is a 16-week literacy and arts program at Patagonia Library that allows kindergarten through 2nd-grade students from local elementary schools to write and illustrate their own books. This session will explain how other libraries can easily and affordably implement their own VYA program.
SUNBROOK B Marketing Library Programs for Increased Impact  presented by Sam Helmick Increase your library’s impact by empowering patrons to contribute to the library marketing conversation. This session will give participants a hands-on look at how teens communicate with each other on social media and how to use social media to promote events.  Learn how to collect patron-driven content for more meaningful dialogue, how to better represent the diversity of your service population in marketing media and how to craft vibrant, engaging campaigns designed to move beyond the brick-and-mortar boundaries of your Library Space.   From traditional paper flyers to the newest social media tricks, we’ll help you level up your library’s marketing game. Platforms covered will include Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr.
SUNBROOK C Utah Library Association’s Traveling Show to Rural and Small Libraries (repeated session)  presented by Valerie Buck and Connie Lamb Every year the Continuing Education Committee for the Utah Library Association has planned, sponsored, and presented the “ULA Fall Workshop” to rural libraries throughout the state. North and south, east and west, a different location each year, we have taken presentations about current library issues and solutions to outlying libraries that may not have budgets for training or conferences. This session will tell our dynamic story about our struggles, our learning curves, and the wonderful insights both received and shared through our outreach to Utah’s small and rural libraries. We will show how we do it and share our ideas for the future.
BALLROOM E Libraries and Rural Poverty presented by Graham Tedesco-Blair Rural areas face unique challenges with poverty: many resources are unavailable. Few acknowledge that homelessness exists “in the country”, or the problems the rural poor face. This program will go over the demographics and challenges faced by those in these situations, and then offer solutions and aids to help.
BALLROOM F Technology Education for Senior Citizens (repeated session)  presented by Steve Devine-Jelinski Learn what Moose Lake Public Library is doing to education senior citizens in technology.  iPad, Windows 10, tablets, 3D Printers, laptops, cell phones, and even smart home technology.  Learn how to tailor classes to meet their needs and get additional resources.
12:00 – 12:45 p.m. BALLROOM A, B, C LUNCH (pre registration required) Sponsored by: Collaborative Summer Library Program
12:45 – 2:15 p.m. BALLROOM A, B, C KEYNOTE SPEAKER – RICHARD PAUL EVANS (pre registration required) Sponsored by Utah State Library
2:15 – 3:15 p.m. ENTRADA A IFLA’s Global Vision: An Interactive Discussion  facilitated by Jennifer Pearson Earlier this year, the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) launched a series of Global Vision discussions to bring together thousands of librarians around the world, through face-to-face and online interactive participation, to explore how a connected library field can meet the challenges of the future. IFLA believes that the challenges facing the library field from ever-increasing globalization can only be met and overcome by an inclusive, global response from a united library field. By joining us for this webinar, you can participate in this global discussion to identify future challenges and opportunities facing the library field and help to prioritize actions that a united and connected library field can take.
ENTRADA B Elevated Staff, Elevated Library  presented by Jamie Paicely This session is all about how to elevate your staff!  From staff recognition to staff involvement, we will focus on how to make sure you have a happy and involved staff (for cheap!) that loves their jobs and feels appreciated at work!  Staff meetings, staff gifts, staff excellence!
ENTRADA C It’s Not Bragging if it’s True:  Communicating Library Successes With Key Shareholders presented by Patrick Bodily Librarians are notoriously tight lipped when it comes to sharing successes.  Come learn about how to tell our stakeholders what we’ve done without sounding arrogant, and the purpose of a good grassroots advocacy campaign.
SUNBROOK A MakerBoxes: Maker Programs in a Box presented by Melendra Sanders This presentation discusses Maker kits to be shared by branch libraries, in consortium, or across a state. Our Maker kits significantly reduced the cost of maker programs and are used by librarians with little or no experience with the topics to provide programs they otherwise wouldn’t consider or couldn’t afford.
SUNBROOK B Gamification in Your Library: How to Use Board, Card and Video Games for Fun and Education presented by Paul Zurawski Games are fun and appeal to audiences of all ages while at the same time serving as tools for learning concepts such as statistics and probability. This session will explain gamification, as well as include demonstrations of several games that are easy to learn and full of educational concepts.
SUNBROOK C Grow the Library’s Role – Impact of a Community Garden presented by Dianne Connery The establishment of our community garden and edible landscaping has created new partnerships – local colleges, health organizations, scientists, artists, and businesses. It is attracting new users. This session will review the steps to get it started and where we see it going.
BALLROOM E Adult Programs: The Tops and Flops (repeated session)  presented by Joey Holmes A top ten (and bottom ten) listing of adult programs I’ve put on at the Laurens County Library.  A humorous look at what has worked well for us and what failed.  Included will be some honorable mentions of programs that went well, that I did not do.
BALLROOM F Bursting at the Seams: Extraordinary Service in Limited Space (repeated session)  presented by Beth List and Hope Decker A lack of physical space doesn’t mean a library can’t be exceptional!  Two rural (municipal, association) library directors will describe how they defied the odds of their space conundrum.  Bring home ideas on how to make the most of your library space, exceed your community’s needs without sacrificing your sanity!
3:15 – 3:45 p.m. EXHIBITOR AREA REFRESHMENT BREAK Sponsored by: Biblionix
4:00 – 5:00 p.m. ENTRADA A IFLA’s Global Vision: An Interactive Discussion  facilitated by Jennifer Pearson Earlier this year, the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) launched a series of Global Vision discussions to bring together thousands of librarians around the world, through face-to-face and online interactive participation, to explore how a connected library field can meet the challenges of the future. IFLA believes that the challenges facing the library field from ever-increasing globalization can only be met and overcome by an inclusive, global response from a united library field. By joining us for this webinar, you can participate in this global discussion to identify future challenges and opportunities facing the library field and help to prioritize actions that a united and connected library field can take.
ENTRADA B Book, Line & Sinker:  Tactics, Tips and Tricks to Lure in More (Adult) Readers (repeated session)  presented by Jeremy Bolom Statistics prove that reading is neither a favorite activity nor a priority for a majority of adults.  Find out how the use of incentives, displays, and social media can entice, encourage, and engage readers in and outside the library, AND build a new base of reading advocacy simultaneously.
ENTRADA C A Model Public Library Board Meeting presented by Kim Rutter and the consulting staff of the Kansas Regional Library Systems Ever wonder if your board meetings could be better run?  Or if you could save time and still cover everything?  Watch our skit of a model board meeting.  The board will gather quorum, observe standard meeting practices and open meeting laws, consider gift policies, and more.
SUNBROOK A Inclusive Summer Reading: Bridging the Gap With Daycares and Preschools presented by Melanie Hornbeck Group Summer Reading is designed so that children in daycares, preschools, and summer schools can participate even without transportation to the library. I will outline how to fund, market, and assist childcare facilities to participate in summer reading, enabling an additional 1500 children to complete the program each year.
SUNBROOK B Let’s Move!  Public Libraries Impacting Physical Fitness in Their Communities presented by Noah Lenstra Throughout rural and small town America, there are limited opportunities to learn about and to practice physical fitness. Libraries respond to this need through movement-based programming, everything from yoga classes to running/walking groups. Based on results from a national study of this topic (http://www.letsmovelibraries.org/), this break-out session will present best practices and engage participants in constructive discussion about how this programming can be developed through community partnerships.
SUNBROOK C Show It off: The Power of Merchandising presented by Rebecca Budinger Looking to increase circulation and highlight your collection? Take your displays from ordinary to extraordinary! Show off materials with merchandising ideas perfect for a small library & budget. After 18 years with a bookstore chain, the presenter has insider secrets and tips of the trade. Participants will share ideas too!
BALLROOM E Future Ready Middle Schoolers (YALSA) (repeated session)  presented by Linda Braun In 2017, as a part of a YALSA and ARSL IMLS funded project, 16 staff from small, rural, and tribal libraries across the US embarked on envisioning and designing a library service – with a community partner – that supports middle school student college career readiness.  Hear from a group of those staff and learn what they’ve implemented so far. You will also get some ideas on how you too can support middle schoolers in this way.
BALLROOM F How Diverse is Your Youth Collection? (repeated session)  presented by Meredith Wickham Discover techniques to audit your youth collection to determine whether diverse authors and subject matter are adequately represented on the shelves. Learn some of the many reasons a diverse collection is desirable and how audit results at a rural branch library affected our collection development practices and policy.
6:00 p.m. DIXIE CENTER MAIN DOOR DINE AROUNDS
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8
7:30 – 5:30 p.m. DIXIE CENTER REGISTRATION DESK OPEN
8:00 – 9:00 a.m. BALLROOMS A, B, C BREAKFAST (preregistration required) Sponsored by:
9:00 – 9:30 a.m. BALLROOMS A, B, C ANNUAL ARSL MEMBERSHIP MEETING
9:00 – 5:00 p.m. EXHIBITOR AREA EXHIBITS OPEN
9:30 – 10:30 A.M. BALLROOMS A, B, C GENERAL SESSION – CLINT LEWIS Sponsored by:
10:30 – 11:00 a.m. EXHIBITOR AREA EXHIBIT NO CONFLICT TIME
11:00 – 12:00 P.M. Entrada A Technology Education for Senior Citizens (repeated session)  presented by Steve Devine-Jelinski Learn what Moose Lake Public Library is doing to education senior citizens in technology.  iPad, Windows 10, tablets, 3D Printers, laptops, cell phones, and even smart home technology.  Learn how to tailor classes to meet their needs and get additional resources.
Entrada B $how me the Money$  presented by KE Hones Are you wishing your library had Giant Jenga, a local author visit, maker space supplies or colorful reading rug? Grant writing is a skill that can enrich & expand student learning. Learn 5 strategies for writing successful grants. Hands of workshop: participants will draft a grant including budget; telling a compelling story, budget, grant writing “rules” & matching funding source.  (Special tips for Donors Choose, including student written grants!)
Entrada C Break Out of Boring Programming (repeated session) presented by Andrea Scherer Do your programs lack excitement, pizzazz, heart-pounding, clock-racing adrenaline?  You might need a dose of BREAKOUT!  Learn about creating and running engaging breakout and escape room programs for all ages that don’t break the bank.
Sunbrook A Reimagining Libraries: What Your Communities Really Want presented by Ken DeSieghardt This session will provide you new ideas for measuring and managing community expectations, for making more effective connections between the library and residents, and for putting your library in a position for ballot box success — if and when that time comes.
Sunbrook B Community Memory and Social Change presented by Lynette Johnson With support from the IMLS and Knight Foundation, Historypin is working with rural public libraries across three states to provide toolkits for bringing people together to share and preserve local history. Historypin describes how a small library can lead a community-strengthening memory project and measure its social impact.
Sunbrook C Managing Internet Speed  presented by Tine Walczyk Library systems coming to a crawl while patrons are watching YouTube or other streaming services? Wish there was a way to guarantee staff computer response times? Wanting to allow after hours internet access in the parking without endangering your data? Is your staff data safe from patron hacking? We will investigate network segmenting options and what can you do inside your building to separate different groups of traffic.
Ballroom E Rising to the Challenge: Using the Aspen Institute Report “Rising to the Challenge: Re-envisioning Public Libraries for Strategic Planning”  prsented by Anna Yount The Aspen Institute Dialogue on Public Libraries report “Rising to the Challenge: Re-Envisioning Public Libraries” and its companion Action Guide can be powerful tools for libraries as we seek to leverage our position as a trusted community resource to forge new partnerships for achieving community goals. Learn how one small public library used the Aspen Report in its strategic planning process to develop a dynamic new road map for community success.
Ballroom F Future Ready Middle Schoolers (YALSA) (repeated session)  presented by Linda Braun, Christina Boyles and Stephanie Loiselle In 2017, as a part of a YALSA and ARSL IMLS funded project, 16 staff from small, rural, and tribal libraries across the US embarked on envisioning and designing a library service – with a community partner – that supports middle school student college career readiness.  Hear from a group of those staff and learn what they’ve implemented so far. You will also get some ideas on how you too can support middle schoolers in this way.
12:00 – 1:30 p.m. BALLROOMS A, B, C AUTHOR LUNCHEON – BRANDON MULL (preregistration required) Lunch Sponsor: Public Library Association

Speaker Sponsor:  Washington County Library

1:45 – 2:45 p.m. Entrada A Developing Dynamic Leadership For Your Library  presented by Gavin Woltjer This program explores five areas of dynamic library leadership: accountability and expectations; failure; initiative and creativity; library narrative; and, communication. Through the combination of these five areas, participants will begin to better understand the type of leadership their library needs in order to best serve their patrons. As libraries continue to evolve, leadership needs to evolve in order to meet the needs of patrons and staff!
Entrada B Destination Your Library presented by Jean Bosch and Tiffany Rohe Small and rural libraries are often the only game in town for services, spaces, events, and programs and they are also free of charge.  Make your library a special place to visit full of surprise and delight where they will want to stay for a length of time!
Entrada C Out-of-This-World Programs on a Down-to-Earth Budget  presented by Hannah Stewart and Keliann LaConte from the National Center for Interactive Learning Space Science Institute Experience hands-on activities and NASA resources that you can use in summer reading programs in 2018 and beyond.  Share ideas for engaging learners of all ages in science discoveries and exploration – with limited staff and budget.  Join STAR_Net’s online community to access additional resources and step-by-step implementation guides.
Sunbrook A Solve the Riddles, Crack the Codes, Unlock the Candy!   Presented by Mary Soucie Do puzzles, games and scavenger hunts excite you? Then this session is for you. Come try to break into a treasure chest full of surprises and learn how to run a break-in box program at your library. Enthusiasm required!
Sunbrook B Activate, Collaborate and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming in Your Community (part 1)  presented by Bobbi Newman Participants will learn effective methods for conducting health information outreach in their communities, selecting key community partners, and how to create/carry-out health programs by integrating free National-Library-of-Medicine resources to inform community members in fun and engaging ways. Examples of programs for children, teens, adults, and seniors will be shared.
Sunbrook C How to Start a Seed Library on a Local Level  presented by Jennifer Lyon Seed libraries are a topic of great interest and are alive and flourishing across the county.   In this session, we will discuss what a seed library is, how to start one at your local library, and different types of programs you can run to enhance your collection and patron experience.
Ballroom E Inspire a Lifelong Love of Reading…One Party at a Time: A How to Guide for Hosting Epic Summer Reading Programs  presented by Paul Daybell, Talysa Brimley, and Adam Winger The North Logan Library is notorious for our epic Summer Reading Programs. Come learn how we systematized a model allowing our small rural library to: 1) Host hundreds of summer programs (average attendance 100+), 2) Utilize creative staffing methods, and 3) Leverage our success to better engage with community partners.
Ballroom F Don’t Judge a Book By Its Cover: Libraries’ Expanding Role as Catalysts of Community Change Part 1   presented by Dr. Kathryn “Kit” Matthew and Charles “Chip” Gurkin, EPA In this interactive double session, come explore learnings from IMLS’sCommunity Catalyst and Community Salute Initiatives and EPA’s Sustainable Communities Program. We’ll start by examining a few library case studies from across the U.S. Then in small groups, you’ll apply two sets of analyses to understand a hypothetical community better:  community data maps and constituent journey maps.  This will give you practice in determining community challenges and identifying ways a library could intervene via its programs, partnerships, and stakeholders.
2:45 – 3:00 P.M. EXHIBITOR AREA REFRESHMENT BREAK Sponsored by:
3:00 – 4:00 Entrada A Break Out of Boring Programming (repeated session) presented by Andrea Scherer Do your programs lack excitement, pizzazz, heart-pounding, clock-racing adrenaline?  You might need a dose of BREAKOUT!  Learn about creating and running engaging breakout and escape room programs for all ages that don’t break the bank.
Entrada B Connecting Your Users to Legal Services  presented by Debora Person Rural communities are severely underserved by the legal community. There is recent interest in reaching out to these populations, and local public libraries offer an environment to make this connection.  This session introduces the depth of need and ideas for rural libraries to serve as bridges to legal assistance.
Entrada C Book, Line & Sinker:  Tactics, Tips and Tricks to Lure in More (Adult) Readers (repeated session)  presented by Jeremy Bolom Statistics prove that reading is neither a favorite activity nor a priority for a majority of adults.  Find out how the use of incentives, displays, and social media can entice, encourage, and engage readers in and outside the library, AND build a new base of reading advocacy simultaneously.
Sunbrook A Creating Top Notch Service at Your Library  presented by Jamie Matczak Customer service is the bread and butter of our libraries. Other things come and go, but providing great service to our patrons will never change. The best thing? It costs NOTHING. No matter what your staff size or budget is, gain practical tips and tricks to elevate your library’s service.
Sunbrook B Activate, Collaborate and Educate: Health Outreach and Programming in Your Community (part 2)  presented by Bobbi Newman Participants will learn effective methods for conducting health information outreach in their communities, selecting key community partners, and how to create/carry-out health programs by integrating free National-Library-of-Medicine resources to inform community members in fun and engaging ways. Examples of programs for children, teens, adults, and seniors will be shared.
Sunbrook C Partnering with Your Park  presented by Danielle Gayman and Noah Glaude Take the library outside by partnering with your local park! NOLS has partnered with the Olympic National Park in a variety of fun and engaging programs in recent years. Learn about programming ideas, successfully working with your local park or natural resources organization, and navigating the planning and implementation logistics.
Ballroom E Sometime, Hearing is Believing:  Using Oral Narratives to Inspire Youth Toward STEM  presented by Marvin Carr and Sarah Fuller from IMLS Librarians and story tellers have known and explored the importance of the oral narrative for many years.  While the current movement in support of STEM education seems unrelated to this pastime of the oral narrative, several of our colleagues have taken up the challenge of testing if the two actually complement each other.  This session will explore the phenomena that have emerged while children and families from diverse economic, social, and cultural backgrounds learn from the oral narratives of STEM professional during library sponsored STEM programing and discuss the iterative-design process driving the research.  Come explore and hear how such an approach complements other approaches in the field to deepen the engagement of families and younger children with STEM and inspire youth towards STEM careers.
Ballroom F Don’t Judge a Book By Its Cover: Libraries’ Expanding Role as Catalysts of Community Change Part 2   presented by Dr. Kathryn “Kit” Matthew and Charles “Chip” Gurkin, EPA In this interactive double session, come explore learnings from IMLS’sCommunity Catalyst and Community Salute Initiatives and EPA’s Sustainable Communities Program. We’ll start by examining a few library case studies from across the U.S. Then in small groups, you’ll apply two sets of analyses to understand a hypothetical community better:  community data maps and constituent journey maps.  This will give you practice in determining community challenges and identifying ways a library could intervene via its programs, partnerships, and stakeholders.
4:00 – 5:00 p.m. EXHIBITOR AREA LAST OPPORTUNITY TO VISIT EXHIBITOR’S TABLES
4:30  p.m. EXHIBITOR AREA VENDOR PRIZE RAFFLE – YOU MUST BE PRESENT TO WIN!
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9
8:00 – 11:00 a.m. DIXIE CENTER REGISTRATION DESK OPEN
8:30 – 9:30 a.m. Entrada A Not Just for Kids: After Hours Programming for Adults  presented by Amy Turgasen Due to everyday life commitments, adults can’t always make it to programming during regular business hours. Being more flexible with program times and branching out to alternate locations can boost attendance and be a lot of fun at the same time. This session would look at how to provide after-hours programming from start to finish for adults, while utilizing limited funds, staffing and space, and how to prepare for the “what-ifs,” including permission/liability forms.
Entrada B Peak Performance Programs: How to Match the Right Program With the Right Sponsor  presented by Anna Bates Having problems finding a sponsor for your library program? This session explains a new way to seek sponsorship, with examples from other small & rural libraries’ success stories.
Entrada C Bursting at the Seams: Extraordinary Service in Limited Space (repeated session)  presented by Beth List and Hope Decker A lack of physical space doesn’t mean a library can’t be exceptional!  Two rural (municipal, association) library directors will describe how they defied the odds of their space conundrum.  Bring home ideas on how to make the most of your library space, exceed your community’s needs without sacrificing your sanity!
Sunbrook A Getting Teens More Than “In the Door” at Your Library  presented by Jane Blue It’s tough to get teens into your library and engaged, so what can you do to make that a reality?  Programs, volunteer hours, gaming, and so much more.  This session will give you ideas you can take back to your library that will help you get teens into your library and keep them engaged and coming back.
Sunbrook B Elevate Your Reach (repeated session)  presented by Lisa Lewis Elevate your library by reaching beyond the walls of the library.  This session will teach you about a successful outreach program that targets those who are no longer able to visit the library in person.  Book Bundles for Seniors along with storytimes that are presented in nursing facilities, assisted living facilities and senior centers.
Sunbrook C When a Patron Needs More Than a Book: Transformation Has no “Due Date” (repeated session)  presented by Sharon Morris and Kieran Hixon Libraries can be transformational. Have you accidentally helped people transform? Are you ready to be an intentional champion for your patrons? Join us as we explore services that make all the difference. Together we’ll discover how to shift library service from a transaction into an interaction, with meaningful life improvement.
Ballroom E Utah Library Association’s Traveling Show to Rural and Small Libraries (repeated session)  presented by Valerie Buck and Connie Lamb Every year the Continuing Education Committee for the Utah Library Association has planned, sponsored, and presented the “ULA Fall Workshop” to rural libraries throughout the state. North and south, east and west, a different location each year, we have taken presentations about current library issues and solutions to outlying libraries that may not have budgets for training or conferences. This session will tell our dynamic story about our struggles, our learning curves, and the wonderful insights both received and shared through our outreach to Utah’s small and rural libraries. We will show how we do it and share our ideas for the future.
Ballroom F Grinding Up the Rumor Mill: How to Deal With Bad Press in a Small Town (part 1)  presented by Jessica Pacciotti In a small town one upset person can quickly spread and infect the entire town. Come hear how one library battled back to recover their reputation. Learn how to use bad press to your advantage, and how to recover if your town begins to distrust and revile your library.
9:45 – 10:45 a.m. Entrada A How Diverse is Your Youth Collection? (repeated session)  presented by Meredith Wickham Discover techniques to audit your youth collection to determine whether diverse authors and subject matter are adequately represented on the shelves. Learn some of the many reasons a diverse collection is desirable and how audit results at a rural branch library affected our collection development practices and policy.
Entrada B Small Libraries Create Smart Spaces  presented by Betha Gutsche Learn from the dynamic experiences of fifteen small libraries, who re-imagined and reconfigured “smart spaces,” where community members co-create, participate in hands-on learning, and strengthen social connections. You’ll learn how to uncover community needs, interpret the input, generate ideas and prototype those ideas with simple, low-cost materials. It’s transformation!
Entrada C How to Become a Great Speaker: A Step By Step Guide  presented by Simone Kirk Easy tips to become a great speaker: Blow some fresh air into your presentation: Learn how to be a better advocate for your library and quit sweating over your next speech, presentation, or official public appearance. Trained by Toastmasters International, I’ll share all wisdom, dos and don’ts!
Sunbrook A Adult Programs: The Tops and Flops (repeated session)  presented by Joey Holmes A top ten (and bottom ten) listing of adult programs I’ve put on at the Laurens County Library.  A humorous look at what has worked well for us and what failed.  Included will be some honorable mentions of programs that went well, that I did not do.
Sunbrook B Elevate Your Reach (part 2)  presented by Lisa Lewis Elevate your library by reaching beyond the walls of the library.  This session will teach you about a successful outreach program that targets those who are no longer able to visit the library in person.  Book Bundles for Seniors along with storytimes that are presented in nursing facilities, assisted living facilities, and senior centers.
Sunbrook C When a Patron Needs More Than a Book: Transformation Has no “Due Date” (repeated session)  presented by Sharon Morris and Kieran Hixon Libraries can be transformational. Have you accidentally helped people transform? Are you ready to be an intentional champion for your patrons? Join us as we explore services that make all the difference. Together we’ll discover how to shift library service from a transaction into an interaction, with meaningful life improvement.
Ballroom E Soaring into Higher Education: The Coalition for Access, Affordibility, and Success  presented by Nara Lee The Coalition developed a free platform of online tools to facilitate the experience of applying to college and offers rural libraries an opportunity to enhance access to higher education.  We’ll describe: utility of tools, value of external showcase, and ways librarians are essential partners in connecting students to resources which help them access and attain a college education.
Ballroom F Grinding Up the Rumor Mill: How to Deal With Bad Press in a Small Town (part 2)  presented by Jessica Pacciotti In a small town one upset person can quickly spread and infect the entire town. Come hear how one library battled back to recover their reputation. Learn how to use bad press to your advantage, and how to recover if your town begins to distrust and revile your library.
10:45 – 12:15 p.m. BALLROOMS A, B, C BRUNCH (preregistration required) Sponsored by:
CLOSING GENERAL SESSION – LANCE CONRAD
POST CONFERENCE SESSION
1:00 – 5:00 P.M. CELEBRATING THE STORIES OF YOUR COMMUNITY: A LISTENING SESSION WITH STORYCORPS MADELEINE WITENBERG, Project Manager of StoryCorps Digital Toolsand EDDIE GONZALEZ, MFA, Manager of StoryCorps Community Training

]]> Library Director, North Sioux City Community Library, SD http://arsl.info/library-director-north-sioux-city-community-library-sd/ Tue, 25 Jul 2017 03:25:21 +0000 http://arsl.info/?p=8299 The North Sioux City Community Library in North Sioux City, SD is hiring a new Library Director. We’re in a tri-state area consisting of North Sioux City, SD, Sioux City, IA (pop. 82,000), and South Sioux City, NE (pop. 13,000). The North Sioux library is a brand new building (3 yrs old) serving a very supportive city of 2,500 people plus an estimated 2,500 other community members.

PURPOSE OF POSITION
Under general supervision of the City Administrator and the Library Board of Trustees the Library Director is responsible for the administration, operation, and management of the North Sioux City Public Library. Responsible for managing all library programs and services, supervising staff, and managing departmental budget and facilities.

The position is designed for 40 hours per week and would require the Director to work a 4 hour Saturday shift 1 or 2 times per month.

Graduation from High School or GED program. Bachelor’s Degree in Library Science, English, Literature or a similar field. Master’s Degree in related field is preferred. Three years of progressive experience in a library system.

For full job description, the city application and how to apply, click on the following link: http://northsiouxcity-sd.gov/depts/dept_HR.html or call Ted Cherry at 605-232-4276.

Competition closes August 11, 2017. First review of applications starts the week of August 14, 2017.

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